Matriarch & Rogue Rex Wild Riesling 2017

This one named after winemaker Marnie Roberts’ grandfather. Now, normally Clare Valley Riesling is such a precise, pure thing that invokes such descriptors as “laser like” and “diamond edged.” However, Marnie’s not seeing Rex in such a clear light. I don’t think she’ll be run out of the valley, but foot stomping, 7 days on skins and a little oak maturation aren’t the usual riesling processes for the Clare. Wild riesling indeed.

Matriarch & Rogue, Rex, Wild Riesling, Clare Valley, 2017

Carries a cloudy hue. Slightly nutty aromas with a touch of browning apple alongside green apple, grilled limes, steel, mandarin citrus, floral talcy bath bombs and brown spice. Juxtaposition on the palate: rounded yet crunchy. Green apples and limes. A powerful food match: give it a heavy Asian chilli pork or kung pao chicken.

RRP: $28
Alc: 10.8%
Rating: 17.25/20

Wine sample courtesy of Matriarch and Rogue

Advertisements

5 responses to “Matriarch & Rogue Rex Wild Riesling 2017

  1. Thought this an excellent expression of Clare Valley Riz too. Being an adopted Queenslander I have trouble with 20pt scales, but my words are coming along nicely and think you seem to enjoy it too 😉

  2. Thanks Stuart. I use the 20pt scale as based on wine show judging system. We could just as well “score” wines using a 5 star system, out of 10 or 100 or arbitrarily out of 9 aubergines.
    For mine…is 91/92 out of 100 points that different? However, I see that there is a marked difference between 17 and 18 points in this scale. You’ve inspired me though and I’ll put an update to the site with this explained.

    • And we all use the various scoring methods differently anyway. There’s a good guide/graphic I found on Jancis’ site showing how her 20 differs to Wine Spectator, aligns to Parker’s 100.

      I prefer pictures. Like Brookesey’s naked squaw riding a horse for some tip top murky substance he liked.

      My point really being: I liked your words.

      • Jancis’s and other equivalents can be found here No mention of Dave Brookes’ very evocative scale though 🙂

        Big thanks for the feedback, always an evolution!

  3. Pingback: Matriarch & Rogue Dot Riesling 2017 | vinonotebook·

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s